GWRC 2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS

April 28 & 29, 2015
Athens, Georgia

Sponsored by:
U.S. Geological Survey
The Joseph W. Jones Ecological Center
The River Basin Center, Odum School of Ecology
Georgia Institute of Technology
The University of Georgia

Editors:
Robin John McDowell, Chief Coordinator,
Carson A. Pruitt, UGA Graduate Student,
and
Robert Bahn, UGA Water Resources

Printed in the United States of America.

This book was published by Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2152.  The views and statements advanced in this publication are solely those of the authors and do not represent official views or policies of The University of Georgia, the Georgia Water Research Institute as authorized by the Water Research Institutes Authorization Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-307) or the other conference sponsors.

CLIMATE CHANGE AND COASTAL ISSUES

  1. Climate
    Panel Discussion & Panel Guests:

    The science-policy interface: bridging environmental science and policy in the twenty-first century

    Water management is a significant issue in the state of Georgia as drought, population growth, the Tri-state Water Wars, and growing concerns of global climate change engulf the region. These intractable environmental issues are characterized by high uncertainty, complexity, and swift change. How science is developed and applied to these issues is one major factor influencing “humanity’s environmental future” (Caldwell 1990). Yet, science is currently underutilized in environmental policy despite the growing call for effective scientific engagement in public policy (NSF 2002). This panel explores how scientific evidence can be best applied to growing environmental pressures facing decision makers in the state of Georgia. The panelists vary in their approach with some synthesizing science-policy interface literatures to decipher best practices while others contribute original research through detailed ethnographic and social studies. Overall, the objectives of this panel are to enhance the theoretical understandings of the science-policy interface while informing efforts to bridge environmental science and policy, particularly in complex political arenas.

    1. Rob McDowell
    2. Stephanie Benfield
    3. Laurie Fowler
    4. Katharine Jacobs
  2. Climate Change and Water Resources
    Presentations:

    1. Baseflow Response to Climate Variability Induced Droughts in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, S. Sarmistha; Auburn University, Department of Biosystems Engineering, 200 Corley Bldg., Auburn, AL, 36849
    2. Value of Adaptive Drought Management for the ACF River Basin, Aris P. Georgakakos and Huaming Yao; Georgia Water Resources Institute, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 790 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332-0355
    3. Effects of Climate Signals on Freshwater Delivery to Four Georgia Riverine Estuaries, J. Sheldon1, Adrian Burd2, and Merryl Alber2; 1Research Professional, Dept. of Marine Sciences, University of Georgia; 2Professor, Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
    4. Monthly Water Budgets at Panola Mountain Research Watershed, Georgia with some Implications for Climatic Change, Brent T. Aulenbach1, N.E. Peters1, and J. Freer2; 1U.S. Geological Survey, South Atlantic Water Science Center, 1770 Corporate Drive, Suite 500, Norcross, GA 30093; 2School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, University Road, Bristol BS8 1SS, United Kingdom
    5. Temporal Changes in Drought in Georgia: Implications for Agriculture and Water Supply in the Future, Pam N. Knox
      Crop and Soil Sciences Department, University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602
  3. Shoreline Stabilization
    Panel Discussion & Panel Guests:

    Shoreline stabilization and the changing face of Georgia's coast

    In the face of changing climate and sea level rise, the 100-mile coast of Georgia is changing. Some areas are accreting, and many areas are eroding. Shoreline stabilization is a land management tool designed to protect or reinforce shoreline areas with man-made structures. Traditional methods of shore stabilization, like bulkheads and sea walls, can slow erosion rates and may be suitable in developed areas. However, they alter shoreline and water dynamics and often lead to loss of beach and intertidal habitat. Softer techniques, such as living shorelines and plantings, utilize natural materials and can enhance intertidal habitats and promote vegetative growth. However, soft techniques may not be suitable in high-energy environments. This panel discussion will include a brief overview of the benefits and drawbacks of shoreline stabilization methods, a presentation of regulations and policies in place governing shore stabilization, a demonstration of soft shoreline techniques in practice along Georgia¹s dynamic coastal communities, and a group discussion about options recognizing the need for various techniques for different situations. Panel members will include representatives from the scientific and legal communities, state agencies, research institutions, and non-profit organizations working to promote stable shorelines that enhance our natural resources and protect our communities.

    1. Alice M. Keyes
    2. Tom Bliss
    3. Jan MacKinnon
    4. Christi Lambert
  4. Adapting to a Changing Coast I
    Presentations:

    1. Development of a Coastal Drought Index using Salinity Data, Paul A. Conrads
      Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
    2. Investigations in Coastal Water Quality for OWTS Planning Efforts, C.R. Bodrey1, D.E. Radcliffe2, J.K. Bradshaw3; 1Marine Extension Service, University of Georgia, Brunswick GA 31520; 2Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602, 3Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development, Athens GA 30605
    3. Saltwater Intrusion in the Floridan Aquifer System Near Downtown Brunswick, Georgia, Gregory S. Cherry; Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
    4. Antimicrobial Pesticide Registration for the Removal of Bacteria from Stormwater Runoff, Mark B. Miller; Research Scientist, AquaShieldTM, Inc., 2733 Kanasita Drive, Suite 111, Chattanooga TN 37343
    5. P Speciation in Sediments of the Minnesota River Basin, Ashley L. Grundtner and Satish C. Gupta; University of Minnesota, St Paul, Water Resources Center, 1985 Buford Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55108
  5. Adapting to a Changing Coast II
    Presentations:

    1. Interpreting Recent Groundwater Chemistry Results from St. Catherine's Island, Georgia, James S. Reichard1, Kelly Vance1, and Brian K. Meyer2; 1Department of Geology and Geography, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro GA 30460; 2Department of Geosciences, Georgia State University, Atlanta GA 30302
    2. Spatial and Temporal Assessment of Back-Barrier Erosion on Cumberland Island National Seashore, Daniel L. Calhoun; Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
    3. Environmental Metabolomics and Biomonitoring of Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Wild Eastern Oysters from Georgia, USA Estuaries, David W. Brew1, W. Matthew Henderson2, and Marsha C. Black1; 1Department of Environmental Health Science, University of Georgia, Athens GA; 2National Exposure Research Laboratory, Offce of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Athens GA
    4. Assessment of the Reach and Ecological Condition Due to Coastal Flooding in Georgia Coast with Advanced Geospatial Technology Application, Sudhanshu Panda; Associate Professor, Institute of Environmental Spatial Analysis, University of North Georgia, Gainesville Campus, 3820 Mundy Mill Rd., Oakwood GA 30566
    5. Climate Change and the Resilience of Tidal Wetland Carbon Sequestration, C. S. Hopkinson1, J. Morris2, and M. Kirwan3; 1Department of Marine Sciences, University of Georgia; 2University of S. Carolina; 3Virginia Institute of Marine Science

URBAN WATER QUALITY AND NPS

  1. Green Infrastructure
    Presentations:

    1. Clarkesville Green Infrastructure Implementation Strategy, Eric J. Byrne
      Water Resources Engineer, Tetra Tech, 2110 Powers Ferry Road, S.E. Atlanta GA 30339
    2. Green Infrastructure in a Small Unregulated Community: Process and Lessons from Clarkesville, Georgia, Duncan L. Hughes; Headwaters Outreach Director, Chattahoochee Riverkeeper 615F Oak St., Suite 1000, Gainesville GA 30501
    3. Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM Green Industries Best Management Practices: Education for the Protection of Florida's Waters and Natural Resources, Donald P. Rainey1, Esen A. Momol2, Laurie E. Trenholm2, Mike Thomas3, and Alberto Chavez4; 1University of Florida, IFAS, Sarasota County Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Friendly-Landscaping Program, 6700 Clark Road., Sarasota FL 34241; 2University of Florida, IFAS, Environmental Horticulture Department, P.O. Box 110675, Gainesville FL 32611; 3Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Nonpoint Source Management Section, 2600 Blair Stone Rd., Tallahassee FL 32399; 4Rookery Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, 300 Tower Road, Naples FL 34113
    4. Selection and Implementation of a Comprehensive Stormwater Improvement Project, Julie Kaplan Water Resources Scientist, Tetra Tech, 2110 Powers Ferry Road, S.E. Atlanta GA 30339
    5. Georgia Nonpoint Source Prioritization, Glen R. Behrend1, Jeffrey Linzer2, and Brandon Moody3; 1Manager, Nonpoint Source Protection Program; 2Manager, Nonpoint Source Grant Program; 3Watershed Planning and Monitoring Program; Georgia Environmental Protection Division, Atlanta GA
  2. Green Infrastructure
    Panel Discussion & Panel Guests:

    The greening of Georgia: latest innovations in green infrastructure

    A diverse panel of academicians, government staff and nongovernmental advocates will share the latest news about the “greening of Georgia”. Jon Calabria and Alfie Vick at the UGA College of Environment and Design will discuss recent national and state shifts in stormwater management that emphasize runoff reduction using green infrastructure. They will present design details and performance expectations of recommended green infrastructure practices. Cory Rayburn from the City of Atlanta’s Department of Watershed Management will talk about the approach Atlanta has taken to promote green infrastructure through city ordinances and other policies. Polly Sattler from Hartsfield/Jackson Atlanta Airport and Ben Emanuel from American Rivers will discuss efforts to restore water quality and hydrology in the Flint River headwaters through the implementation of green stormwater infrastructure at the world’s busiest airport. They will present the recently completed Land Suitability Analysis for Green Infrastructure Stormwater Management at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport which provides recommendations for implementation of green infrastructure at the airport and provides a framework for incorporating green infrastructure when planning new airport projects.

    1. Alfie Vick
    2. John Calabria
    3. Cory Rayburn
    4. Polly Satler
    5. Ben Emanuel
  3. Nutrient Management
    Presentations:

    1. Effects of Land-Applied Biosolids on Surface-Water Nutrient Yields and Ground-Water Quality in Orange County, NC, Chad R. Wagner; Chief, Raleigh Studies Unit, U.S. Geological Survey
    2. Optimal Policy Design for Upgrading On-site Residential Wastewater Treatment: Does the Baseline Scenario Matter?, Jeffrey D. Mullen; Associate Professor, Agricultural and Applied Economics, University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602
    3. Speciation Dynamics of Nutrients and Heavy Metals During Thermal and Hydro-Thermal Treatment of Sewage Sludge, Rixiang Huang; Post-doctoral Associate, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive Atlanta GA 30332-0340
    4. Evolving Nutrient Management Strategies and Potential Applications in Georgia, Douglas S. Baughman; Principal Technologist and Senior Scientist, CH2M HILL, 1000 Abernathy Rd NE #1600, Atlanta GA 30328
    5. Fecal Coliforms, E. Coli and PCR Based Microbial Source Tracking in Streams of Puerto Rico, Brennan Poon-Kwong; Graduate Student, Georgia College and State University, 231 W. Hancock St., Milledgeville GA 31061
  4. North Georgia Water Planning
    Presentations:

    1. Update of the Water Resource Management Plans for the Metropolitan North Georgia Water Planning District, Daniel Johnson; Manager, Metropolitan North Georgia Water Planning District, 40 Courtland Street, NE Atlanta GA 30303
    2. Nonpoint Source and Green Infrastructure Planning in the Atlanta Region, Chris Faulkner
      Atlanta Regional Commission, 40 Courtland Street, NE Atlanta, GA 30303
    3. Effect of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Total Nitrogen and Base Flow in Urban Streams of Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, Nahal Hoghooghi1 and David E. Radcliffe2; 1PhD Student, Crop & Soil Sciences Department, University of Georgia, Athens GA; 2Professor, Crop & Soil Sciences Department, University of Georgia, Athens GA
    4. Utility Climate Resiliency Study for the MNGWPD, Kirk Westphal
      CDM Smith, One Cambridge Place, 50 Hampshire Street, Cambridge Massachusetts 02139
    5. Effects of Exurbanization in the Upper Little Tennessee River Basin: Sedimentation is Predictable, Flow and Specific Conductivity are Not, Robert A. Bahn
      Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602
  5. Groundwater
    Presentation:

    1. Use of Metered Irrigation Water Use and Landsat Imagery to Estimate Irrigation Rates for Surface-Water–Groundwater Availability Modeling in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, Southwestern Georgia, Lynn J. Torak; Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
    2. Estimating Soil and Groundwater Attenuation Factors for Nitrogen from Onsite Wastewater Systems in the Chesapeake Bay TMDL, D.E. Radcliffe, N. Hoghooghi, and M. Habteselassie; Professor, Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602
    3. Groundwater Sustainability in the Augusta-Richmond County Area, Eastern Georgia, Gerard J. Gonthier; Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
    4. Recharge Estimates and Baseline Hydrologic Data for the Surficial Aquifer, Jekyll Island, Georgia, Debbie W. Gordon; Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
    5. Comparing Instream and Upland Bedrock Fracturing and Stream Reach Orientation to Predict Groundwater/Surface Water Interaction in the Lower Flint River Basin, Robin J. McDowell1 and Kathleen Rugel2,3; 1Warnell School of Forestry Resources, UGA, Athens GA; 2Odum School of Ecology, UGA, Athens GA; 3Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center at Ichauway, 3988 Jones Center Drive, Newton GA 39870

HYDROLOGIC MONITORING, DATA, AND TOOLS

  1. Modeling and Tools I
    Presentations:

    1. Sensitivity of Statistical Thresholds in Stream Flows, Dong H. Kim
      Georgia Environmental Protection Division, Watershed Protection Branch, 2 MLK, Jr., Dr. NW, Atlanta GA 30334
    2. Supplemental Tools for Natural Channel Design, Patrick L. McMahon
      Project Engineer, S&ME Inc., 1413 Topside Road, Louisville TN 37777
    3. Long-Term Citizen-Led Monitoring Detects Biological Responses to an Acute Toxicity Event in Trail Creek, Athens GA, USA, David W. P. Manning, Reid Brown, Phillip M. Bumpers, Bruno Giri, and S. Kyle McKay; Science and Monitoring Committee, Upper Oconee Watershed Network, PO Box 53, Athens GA 30603
    4. Estimating Water Temperature Changes Through Hyporheic Flow Paths: Possible Implications for Stream Temperature Modeling, Kristin A. Kraseski; Graduate Research Assistant, University of Georgia, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, Athens GA 30602
    5. Developing a HEC-ResSim Model in the Ocmulgee-Oconee-Altamaha River Basin, Feng Jiang and Jeffrey Regan; Georgia Environmental Protection Division, Watershed Protection Branch, 2 MLK, Jr., Dr. NW, Atlanta, GA 30334
  2. Modeling and Tools II
    Presentations:

    1. Streamstats— A Web-Based Tool for Estimating Streamflow Characteristics in Georgia, Anthony J. Gotvald; Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
    2. Implementing a Network-Based Water-Use Data System for Georgia, Nancy L. Barber
      Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
    3. Simulation of Streamflow in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin as Part of the USGS National Water Census, Jacob H. LaFontaine; Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
    4. Computing Tools for the Water Professional from the U.S. Geological Survey, David C. Leeth
      Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
    5. Fiber Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing: An Emerging Groundwater Monitoring Technology, Kristen B. McSwain
      Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093

RESILIENT WATER MANAGEMENT

  1. Upper Flint Drought Resiliency
    Panel Discussion & Panel Guests:

    Since 2011, American Rivers and Flint Riverkeeper have collaborated to assess low streamflow problems in the Piedmont portion of the Flint River basin and opportunities for restoring drought resilience and healthy flows in the basin. Since 2013, American Rivers has convened the Upper Flint River Working Group, a voluntary and collaborative venue for dialogue among water utilities, non-profit organizations and other stakeholders in water resource sustainability in the upper Flint basin. This session will review the low-flow issues in the basin, the 2014 Resiliency Action Plan charting a path to addressing these issues collaboratively, and other topics from the perspectives of both water utility and NGO participants in the Upper Flint River Working Group.

    1. Ben Emanuel
    2. Lee Pope
    3. Mike Thomas
    4. Gordon Rogers
  2. Water Reclamation and Re-use
    Panel Discussion & Panel Guests:

    Extending the lifecycle of our water in Georgia

    Objectives: Understanding Risk Factors beyond Drought; Identifying Areas for Non Potable Demand and Water Footprint; Achieving Lofty Sustainability Goals in Water Reduction; Private Partnerships and Third Party Funds; and Setting in Motion an Action Plan. Proposed panel discussion with representatives from University of Georgia, Georgia Tech and Emory University and Moderator from Sustainable Water. Panelists will represent and discuss a water reclamation and reuse project at three phases – beginning, middle and end phase where facility is operational. Discussion will include working through identification of need after a risk assessment, feasibility studies, design, permitting, construction and operation. Experience with private financing will be presented to demonstrate how this resource can be utilized to find partners to achieve academic goals while maximizing economic efficiency of critical projects. The panel will also address the state of Georgia’s deep commitment to the conservation of critical freshwater supplies and how this is impacted by current legislation. Their views on how this planning will sustainably meet the needs of economic development in both Georgia and its neighboring states will be explored.

    1. Bob Salvatelli
    2. Jason Gregory
    3. Brent Zern
    4. Ben Liverman
    5. Jonathan Lanciani
  3. Understanding the State of Our Resources
    Presentations:

    1. U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Monitoring in Georgia, Brian E. McCallum
      Associate Director for Data, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
    2. Beyond the Streamgage, John M. Shelton; Chief, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
    3. Informing the Development of a Sustainable Water Management Plan for the ACF River Basin, Martin Kistenmacher and Aris P. Georgakakos; Georgia Water Resources Institute, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
    4. Statewide Water Loss Management Gets Creative to Leverage Long-Term Improvements, Jason Bodwell
      Georgia Environmental Finance Authority, Water Resources Division, 233 Peachtree Street NE , Harris Tower, Suite 900 Atlanta GA 30303
    5. Utilizing Satellite and UAS Imagery to Document Land Cover Trends Impacting Water Quality, Wildlife Habitats and Archeology of the Ocmulgee River Corridor, Christopher S. Cameron, Peter Hawman, Andrew Herring, Gail Miller, Caren Remillard, and Marguerite Madden; NASA DEVELOP, UGA Center, Dept. of Geography, University of Georgia, Athens GA
  4. Sustainability and Re-use I
    Presentations:

    1. On-Campus Water Reuse: Reliability & Readiness, Jonathan A. Lanciani
      President & CEO, Sustainable Water, 4860 Cox Road, Suite 120, Glen Allen VA 23060
    2. New Directions in Conservation Districts, Joey McKinnon1, Shannon Blankinship2, and John Dowd3; 1Local2Global, LLC, 5 West Forsyth Street, Suite 200, Jacksonville Florida 32202; 2St. Johns Riverkeeper, 2800 University Boulevard North, Jacksonville Florida 32211; 3Department of Geology, The University of Georgia, Athens Georgia 30602
    3. Designing Wastewater Irrigation Systems: Engineering Design Inputs, William G. Simmons, Jr.; Director of Bioenergy, Cavanaugh & Associates, P.A., 1904 Eastwood Road, Suite 205, Wilmington NC 28403
    4. Managing Seasonal Sewer Flows with a Plan Based on Averages, William G. Simmons, Jr.; Director of Bioenergy, Cavanaugh & Associates, P.A., 1904 Eastwood Road, Suite 205, Wilmington NC 28403
    5. Remote Telemetry: Managing Remote Reuse Sites, William G. Simmons, Jr.
      Director of Bioenergy, Cavanaugh & Associates, P.A., 1904 Eastwood Road, Suite 205, Wilmington NC 28403
  5. Conservation and Augmentation
    Presentations:

    1. GEFA Conservation Initiatives, Michael Roberts; Georgia Environmental Finance Authority, Water Resources Division, 233 Peachtree Street NE, Harris Tower,Suite 900 Atlanta Georgia 30303
    2. Reservoir Safe Yield Sensitivity Analysis, Jeffery Regan; Georgia Environmental Protection Division, Watershed Protection Branch, 2 MLK, Jr., Dr. NW, Atlanta GA30334
    3. What Georgia Can Learn from Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) in Florida, Sydney T. Bacchus1, Sergio Bernardes2, Wenjing Xu1, and Marguerite Madden1; 1Center for Geospatial Research, University of Georgia, Athens Georgia 30602-2502; 2NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland 20771-2400
    4. State Direct Investment Ground Water Projects, Gail Cowie; Georgia Environmental Protection Division, Watershed Protection Branch, 2 MLK, Jr., Dr. NW, Atlanta GA 30334
    5. Developing Unimpaired Flow (UIF) Data In The Savannah River Basin, Hailian Liang; Georgia Environmental Protection Division, Watershed Protection Branch, 2 MLK, Jr., Dr. NW, Atlanta GA30334

FLOODPLAIN AND FLOOD RISK ASSESSMENT

  1. Floodplain Mapping Workshop:

    The intent of this training is to provide participants the opportunity to increase their flood risk awareness and knowledge of Flood Risk Map Products; whereby they will be better equipped to plan and implement flood related mitigation strategies. The floodplain mapping workshop session will allow attendees to gain a more complete understand all of the Flood Risk MAP products and the Community Rating System incentives, in order to make better regulatory decisions, and improve hazard mitigation plans and identified mitigation actions. The Georgia Department of Natural Resources has developed a tool that helps homeowners quickly determine their flood risk using a web-based mapping tool; www.georgiadfirm.com Residents and business owners can use the maps to obtain reliable information about their flood risk on a property-by-property basis. The maps also provide flood zone and elevation data to help community planners, engineers, builders and others decide where and how new structures, developments, and remodeling projects should be built. Users can quickly locate a property, either using a known address or by clicking the map, to identify the flood risk status, the effective Flood Insurance Rate Map, and even create a flood hazard report that captures all of this information in an attractive and sharable format. The vision for Georgia Flood M.A.P. (Mapping, Planning, & Assessment) has been to develop a statewide program that not only delivers more accurate and complete flood hazard information for counties and municipalities within the state, but also provides information and tools to assist communities in developing more comprehensive mitigation plans that will reduce losses from flooding.

    Georgia Floodplain Management Unit: Todd Harris, CFM; Tom Shillock, CFM; and Thomas Tkacs, PE, CFM; Georgia Environmental Protection Division, Watershed Protection Branch, 2 MLK, Jr., Dr. NW, Atlanta, GA 30334

  2. Floodplain Risk Assessment
    Presentations:

    1. Estimating the Magnitude and Frequency of Floods for Urban and Small, Rural Streams in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, Toby D. Feaster; Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
    2. Effectiveness of LID Technologies to Mitigate the Impact of Climate Change on Stormwater Design Storms, Derek R. Hutton1, Nigel B. Kaye2, and William D. Martin III3; 1Graduate Student, Glenn Department of Civil Engineering, Clemson University; 2Associate Professor, Glenn Department of Civil Engineering, Clemson University; 3Lecturer, General Engineering Department, Clemson University
    3. Georgia Automated Geospatial Flood Potential Map Development and Analysis for Decision Support, Young Kim; Student, Institute of Environmental Spatial Analysis, University of North Georgia, Gainesville Campus, 3820 Mundy Mill Rd., Oakwood GA 30566
    4. Flood Assessment and Evacuation Plan Development for Hypothetical Dam Breach at Sinclair Dam Using HAZUS-MH and ArcGIS Network Analyst, John Dees; Undergraduate Student, Institute of Environmental Spatial Analysis, University of North Georgia, Gainesville Campus, 3820 Mundy Mill Rd., Oakwood GA 30566
    5. Flood Information and Notification System, Mecklenburg County, NC, Jerald B. Robinson
      Charlotte Field Offce Chief, U.S. Geological Survey, Oregon Water Science Center, 810 Tyvola Road, Ste. 108, Charlotte NC 28217

STREAM HABITAT AND AQUATIC CHEMISTRY

  1. Habitat and In-stream Conditions I
    Presentations:

    1. Stream Habitat and Mussel Populations Adjacent to AAWCM Sites in the Lower Flint River Basin, Nathalie D. Smith1, Stephen W. Golladay2, Brian A. Clayton3, and David W. Hicks4; 1Lead Research Technician, 2Associate Scientist, 3Monitoring Technician, 4Scientist, Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center, 3988 Jones Center Drive, Newton, Georgia, 39870
    2. Effects of Reduced Summertime Stream Flows on Instream Habitat in the Lower Flint River Basin, Georgia, USA, Paul V. McCormick1 and Lisa Cowart Baron2,3; 1Scientist and 2Lead Technician, Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center, 3988 Jones Center Dr., Newton, GA 39870; 3Current Position: Coastal Ecologist, National Park Service, Athens, GA
    3. Alterations to Biogeochemical Processes and Sediment Transport by the Invasive Macrophyte, Hydrilla verticallata, in Lake Seminole, Matthew N. Waters; Associate Professor of Biology, Valdosta State University, 1500 N. Patterson St., Valdosta GA 31698
    4. Macroinvertabrate Assemblages of the Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area: An 11-year Study, Courtney R. Holt1, Don Pfitzer2, Chris Scalley2, Broughton A. Caldwell3, Paula I. Capece4, and Darold P. Batzer5; 1Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, Athens 30602; 2Coldwater Fishery Foundation, 710 Riverside Rd, Roswell GA 30075; 3State Collection of Arthropods, Division of Plant Industry, PO Box 147100, Gainesville FL 32614; 4Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area, 1978 Island Ford Pkwy, Sandy Springs GA 30350; 5Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, Athens 30602
    5. A Mathematical Model of Apalachicola Bay Salinity and its Effects on Oyster Harvesting, Beatriz Villegas, Philip J. Roberts, and Aris P. Georgakakos; Georgia Water Resources Institute, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 790 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta GA 30332-0355
  2. Habitat and In-stream Conditions II
    Presentations:

    1. Using Wetland Morphology to Classify Hydrologic Permanency and Habitat Suitability of Isolated Wetlands at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in Northwest Florida, USA, Jeffrey W. Riley; Ecologist, U.S. Geological Survey
    2. Surveying Isolated Wetlands for Presence of Three Imperiled Amphibian Species Using Environmental DNA at Fort Stewart Military Base, GA, Anna M. McKee; Ecologist, U.S. Geological Survey
    3. An Assessment of Algal Communities and the Impact of Ionic Stress on Algal Cells from Streams Impaired by Acid Mine Drainage, Laura L. Aycock1 and Kalina Manoylov2; 1Graduate Student and 2Associate Professor, Dept. Of Biology, Georgia College and State University, 231 W. Hancock St., Milledgeville GA 31061
    4. Potential Sturgeon Habitat in the Lower Flint River, Wei Zeng, Menghong Wen, and Dongha Kim; Georgia Environmental Protection Division, Watershed Protection Branch, 2 MLK, Jr., Dr. NW, Atlanta GA 30334
    5. Watershed Characteristics and Water-Quality Trends and Loads in 12 Watersheds of Gwinnett County, GA, John K. Joiner; Hydrologist Supervisor, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
  3. Habitat and Assessment I
    Presentation:

    1. A Comparison of Macroinvertebrate Communities within Two Southeastern Rivers, Damon L. Mullis, Jason W. Moak, Chalisa Nestell Fabillar, Kelsey Laymon, Nate Hobbs, Brian Metts, Matt Erickson, and Oscar P. Flite III; Research Scientist, Phinizy Center For Water Sciences, 1858 Lock and Dam Road, Augusta GA 30906
    2. Visual Stream Monitoring: Exploring Georgia's Visual Monitoring Methods, Seirisse J. Baker; State Coordinator, Georgia Adopt-A-Stream, Georgia Environmental Protection Division, Watershed Protection Branch, 2 MLK, Jr., Dr. NW, Atlanta, GA 30334
    3. Watershed and Longitudinal Monitoring Events, Harold L. Harbert
      Watershed Outreach Manager, Georgia Environmental Protection Division, Watershed Protection Branch, 2 MLK, Jr., Dr. NW, Atlanta GA 30334
    4. Upstream, Downstream: The Unreliable Aquatic Border between the United States and Canada, Larry Kleitches; Department of Geosciences, Georgia State University, 33 Gilmer Street SE, Atlanta GA 30303
  4. Habitat and Assessment II
    Presentations:

    1. Invertebrate Assemblage Changes Indicative of Reduced Flow in an Agricultural Watershed, Chelsea R. Smith1, P.V. McCormick2, S.W. Golladay2, and Alan P. Covich1; 1Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens 30602-2152; 2J.W. Jones Ecological Research Center, 3988 Jones Center Dr, Newton GA 39870
    2. Assessment of the Texas Best Management Practice Evaluation Tool as a Quantitative Predictor of Field-Scale Phosphorus Loss, Thomas A. Forsberg; Graduate research assistant, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602
    3. Using the Sustainable Boundary Approach (SBA) to assess and develop flow guidelines: the Flint River, Georgia, Stephen W. Golladay1 and David W. Hicks2; 1Associate Scientist, 2Scientist, Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center, 3988 Jones Center Drive, Newton, Georgia, 39870
    4. Early Detection Tools for Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms in Georgia's Inland Waters, Vinay Kumar1 and Benjamin Page2; 1NASA DEVELOP UGA Center; 2Department of Geography, University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602
  5. Sustainability and Re-use II
    Presentations:

    1. Emory University's Water Reclamation System Embodies the Triple-Bottom Line, Brent M. Zern; Assistant Director, Operational Compliance and Maintenance Programs, Emory University Campus Services, Campus Services 100 Water Tower Place, Atlanta GA 30322
    2. Clean Water Act Citizen Suit Enforcement of Wastewater Discharges, Douglas A. Henderson; Partner, Environmental and Natural Resources Practice Group, Troutman Sanders LLP, 600 Peachtree Street, Suite 5200, Atlanta Georgia 30308
    3. Raising Awareness of Critical Water Issues on the College Campus, Candace Timpte
      Professor, School of Science and Technology, Georgia Gwinnett College, 1000 University Center Lane, Lawrenceville GA 30043
    4. Evaluation of Stream Flow and Associated Ecological Needs at Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area in the Context of Upstream Dam Operation Modifications, Hannah Schurman and Christopher J. Anderson; Auburn University, Dept. of Forestry and Wildlife Services, Auburn University, Auburn AL 36849
    5. Small Reservoir Impacts on Stream Water Quality in Agricultural, Developed, and Forested Watersheds: Georgia Piedmont, USA, Amber R. Ignatius1 and Todd C. Rasmussen2; 1PhD Candidate, Department of Geography, arignatius@gmail.com; 2Professor, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, trasmuss@uga.edu; University of Georgia, Athens 30602

RIVER BASIN MANAGEMENT

  1. Savannah River and Harbor
    Presentations:

    1. Managing Savannah River Basin Waters to Optimally Meet Multiple Objectives, Edwin A. Roehl Jr.; CTO, Advanced Data Mining International, 322 Shelton Rd., Travelers Rest SC 29690
    2. Long-term Hydrologic Monitoring by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Susan C. Grams
      Supervisory Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
    3. Biochemical Oxygen Demand in the Savannah River Basin: Results from Six Years of Research, Oscar P. Flite, Jason Moak, and Shawn Rosenquist; CEO and Senior Scientist, Phinizy Center for Water Sciences, 1858 Lock and Dam Road, Augusta GA 30906
    4. A Scientific Basis for the Reconnection of Savannah River Artificial Meander Cutoffs through Flow Releases and Physical Reconfiguration, Tonya Bonitatibus1, Mark A. Cantrell2, Will W. Duncan3, Byron Hamstead4, Eric Krueger5, and Morgan Wolf4; 1Savannah Riverkeeper; 2US Fish and Wildlife Service, Panama City Field Office; 3US Fish and Wildlife Service,Georgia Ecological Services; 4US Fish and Wildlife Service, South Carolina Ecological Services; 5The Nature Conservancy
    5. Savannah Harbor Expansion, Dredging and Mitigation Begin, Jason D. O'Kane
      Savannah Harbor Expansion Project, Senior Project Manager, US Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District, 100 W Oglethorpe Ave, Savannah GA 31401
  2. Savannah River Basin
    Panel Discussion & Panel Guests:

    Maximizing Flow: restoring the Savannah River Basin’s natural flood patterns

    A pending study involving South Carolina, Georgia, The Nature Conservancy and the USACE will specifically address updates to the drought plan using the new drought of record. With revised ecosystem flow recommendations developed by a scientific panel, the study will model the effects of several alternatives of revised Thurmond Dam outflows.

    1. Oscar Flite
    2. Eric Krueger
    3. Will Duncan
    4. Rhett Jackson
    5. Stan Simpson
  3. Ogeechee River
    Presentations:

    1. Preliminary Assessment of Organic Material Flux in the Ogeechee River System: A Lagrangian Perspective, Oscar P. Flite, Shawn Rosenquist, Matt Erickson, Chalisa Nestell, Kelsey Laymon, Nate Hobbs, Damon Mullis, and Jason Moak; Phinizy Center for Water Sciences, 1858 Lock and Dam Road, Augusta GA 30906
    2. Summary and Comparison of Continuous Sonde Data from the Ogeechee and Savannah River Basins, Oscar P. Flite, Shawn Rosenquist, Matt Erickson, Chalisa Nestell, Kelsey Laymon, Nate Hobbs, Damon Mullis, and Jason Moak; CEO and Senior Scientist, Phinizy Center for Water Sciences, 1858 Lock and Dam Road, Augusta GA 30906
    3. Evaluation of Ogeechee River Water Using Zebrafish as a Biomonitoring Tool, Vinoth Kumar Sittaramane; Assistant Professor, Dept. of Biology, Georgia Southern University, P.O. Box 8042, Statesboro GA 30460
    4. Post Fish-Kill Monitoring on the Ogeechee River, Thomas C. Kuhn1 and Stephen P. Vives2; 1Master's Student in Biology, Georgia Southern University; 2Professor in Biology, Georgia Southern University, P.O. Box 8042, Statesboro GA 30460
    5. Benthic Macroinvertebrates Colonizing Leaf Packs in the Ogeechee River Near Rocky Ford: Contrasting Assemblages Between Drought vs. Wet Years, Checo Colon-Gaud; Assistant Professor, Department of Biology, Georgia Southern University, P.O. Box 8042, Statesboro GA 30460

INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE: ENGINES OF GROWTH

  1. Coordinating with Agriculture on Water Stewardship
    Panel Discussion & Panel Guests:

    Agriculture represents a significant part of Georgia’s economy, land-use, and character while also providing lessons on how to manage water resources. This panel will discuss the role agriculture has played in the stewardship of our water resources as well as what opportunities may exist in the future for even more collaboration between water stewardship and agriculture.

    1. Chris Faulkner
    2. Angela Bray
    3. Gary Hawkins
  2. Agricultural Water Use
    Presentations:

    1. Irrigation Uniformity: Ensuring Maximum Sustainable Site Life and Cost Efficiency, William G. Simmons, Jr.; Director of Bioenergy, Cavanaugh & Associates, P.A., 1904 Eastwood Road, Suite 205, Wilmington NC 28403
    2. Exploring the Connection Between Georgia's Forests and Drinking Water, Catherine C. Weisman, Steve McWilliams, and Jimmy Matthews; Georgia Forestry Association, 551 North Frontage Road, Forsyth GA 31029-1217
    3. Applied Irrigation Demand: A Comparison of Theoretical Crop Irrigation Demand to Metered Irrigation Water Use, Jaime A. Painter; Geographer, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
    4. Expanding Irrigation in Alabama: Potential Implications for Georgia's Watersheds, Aaron Bose; Graduate Student, University of Georgia, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Athens GA 30602
    5. Agricultural Chemicals in Surface Waters and Sediments from the Upper Conasauga River, Peter J. Lasier1, Matthew L. Urich1, Sayed M. Hassan2, Whitney N. Jacobs3, Robert B. Bringolf3, Kathleen M. Owens4, Eric Prowell5; 1U.S. Geological Survey, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens GA; 2College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, The University of Georgia Athens, GA; 3Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens GA; 4The Nature Conservancy, P.O. Box 737, Armuchee GA 30105-0737; 5U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Georgia Ecological Services, 105 Westpark Dr., Athens GA 30606-3174
  3. Industrial Water Management
    Presentations:

    1. An Overview of the Electric Utility's Water Research Center, Tyler T. Cromey
      Research Engineer with Southern Company Services, Inc., 241 Ralph McGill Blvd. NE, Atlanta GA 30308
    2. SThe Changing Energy Paradigm in Georgia and its Impact on Our Water Resources, Tim Echols Commissioner, Georgia Public Service Commission, Bogart GA
    3. Status of the Georgia Charge Initiative, David Gipson Georgia Environmental Finance Authority, Water Resources Division, 233 Peachtree Street NE, Harris Tower, Suite 900, Atlanta Georgia 30303
    4. Recreationists' Preferences for Freshwater Amenity Characteristics: Implications from the U.S. Household Survey, Ramesh Ghimire; Post-Doctoral Associate, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602
    5. Water Conservation Efficiencies of Drought Management Rule Exemption, Tim Thoms
      President and Founder, Thoms Trees and Plants, Inc., Fayetteville Georgia 30215

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

  1. Diatom Communities of the Savannah and Altamaha River Estuaries, Ashton B. Arnold1 and Carol J. Pride2; 1Graduate Student, Marine Sciences Program, Dept. of Marine & Environmental Sciences, Savannah State University; 2Professor/Chair, Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Savannah State University, 3219 CollegeSt, Savannah GA 31404
  2. Connecting Data, Disciplines, and Disturbed Hydrology, Andrew B. Bailey
    Masters Candidate, Environmental Planning and Design, University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602
  3. Market-Based Approaches to Resolve Water Conflicts in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, Shannon Bonney1, Laurie Fowler1, Laura Early1, Brian Easley2, Torre Lavelle3, Daniel Read4, and Katie Sheehan Hill1; 1River Basin Center, Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens GA; 2School of Law, University of Georgia; 3Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia; 4Department of Ecological & Environmental Anthropology,University of Georgia
  4. A Study of Chloride and Rhodamine Dye Tracer Movement through an Urban Stream and Raingarden, Ridwan A. Bhuiyan1 and Todd C. Rasmussen2; 1Undergraduate, ridwanb@uga.edu; 2Professor, trasmuss@uga.edu; Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens 30602
  5. Integrated Approach for Subsidence Monitoring and Sinkhole Formation in the Karst Terrain of Dougherty County, Georgia, Matthew D. Cahalan; Graduate Student, Department of Geology, University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602
  6. Water Quality of Episodic Flow through Isolated Wetlands Embedded in a Long Leaf Pine / Wiregrass Ecosystem, James B. Deemy1,2, Jeffrey Hepinstall-Cymerman1, L. Katherine Kirkman2, and Todd C. Rasmussen1; 1Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens GA 30605; 2JW Jones Ecological Research Center, 3988 Jones Center Dr, Newton GA 39870
  7. Influence of Growing Season Stream Flows on Periphyton Growth, David L. Diaz
    Master's Student, University of Georgia, conducting research at the Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center, Athens GA 30602
  8. Lagrangian Sampling of E. Coli in an Urban Stream, Matthew R. Erickson
    Research Scientist, Phinizy Center for Water Sciences, Augusta GA 30906
  9. GIS-Based Water Quality and Quantitative Assessment of Historic Proctor Creek, Atlanta, Georgia, Stephan D. Fitzpatrick1 and Darryl Haddock2; 1Dept. of Life and Earth Sciences, Georgia Perimeter College, 555 North Indian Creek Drive, Clarkston GA 30021-2361; 2West Atlanta Watershed Alliance, Atlanta, GA 1442 Richland Road, Atlanta GA 30310
  10. Monitoring Saltwater Contamination in the Upper Floridian Aquifer, Brunswick GA, Michael D. Hamrick and Gregory S. Cherry; Hydrologic Technician, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
  11. Simulation of Groundwater Flow in the Upper Floridan Aquifer in the Lower Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, Southwestern Georgia and Parts of Alabama and Florida, 2008-2012, L. Elliott Jones; Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
  12. Return to Normal Streamflows and Water Levels: Summary of Hydrologic Conditions in Georgia, 2013, Andrew E. Knaak; Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
  13. Effects of Urbanization on Stream Flashiness in the 1-85 Corridor of the Southeastern Piedmont, Eli B. Koslofsky; Master's Student, Georgia State University
  14. Water Use in Georgia by County for 2010 and Water-Use Trends, 1985–2010, Stephen J. Lawrence; Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
  15. Successional Patterns of Mosquito Abundance in Richmond County, Georgia, Kelsey A. Laymon; Research Scientist, Phinizy Center for Water Science, Augusta GA 30906
  16. Aquifer Storage and Recovery: A Bad Alternative, Emily J. Markesteyn
    Riverkeeper and Executive Director, Ogeechee Riverkeeper
  17. Is Environmental Calcium Availability Limiting Dispersal of an Invasive Snail in Lake Seminole and Associated Smaller Lakes?, Nicholas S. Marzolf1,2, Stephen D. Shivers3, Stephen W. Golladay2, Alan P. Covich1; 1Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602; 2Joseph W Jones Ecological Research Center, Athens, GA 30602; 3Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
  18. Videographic Monitoring of Non-Wadable Streams in Southeast Coast Network Parks, Jacob M. McDonald; Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Geography, University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602
  19. Preliminary Results of Continuous Water Quality Monitoring in the Ogeechee River, Jason W. Moak; Senior Research Manager, Phinizy Center for Water Sciences, Augusta GA 30906
  20. Flood Inundation Mapping in Georgia , Jonathan W. Musser; Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
  21. Effect of Tetrakis (Hydromethyl) Phosphonium Chloride (THPC) on Zebrafish (Danio rerio), Lan Nguyen; Undergraduate Student, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro GA
  22. Hydroclimatology Based Wildfire Susceptibility Automated Geospatial Model Development for Forest Management, TaSudhanshu Panda; Associate Professor, Institute of Environmental Spatial Analysis, University of North Georgia
  23. Continuous Groundwater Level Monitoring and Water Level Trends in the Principal Aquifers of Georgia, Michael F. Peck; Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center, Norcross Georgia 30093
  24. The Collaborative NSF Edge Program and Undergraduate Research Engagement in the Savannah River Estuary, Carol J. Pride; Professor/Chair, Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Savannah State University
  25. Leaf Decomposition Along a Longitudinal Gradient of the Lower Ogeechee River, Tyler G. Reeves; Student, Georgia Southern University
  26. Assessing the Water Quality and Sources of Fecal Pollution in Southwestern Puerto Rico, Ralph S. Rozier
    Student, Georgia College and State University, Milledgeville GA
  27. Impacts of Land Use/Land Cover Change on Catchment Hydrology of Kulfo Watershed: An Assessment Using Hydrologic Model, SWAT, Ayalkibet Mekonnen Seka
  28. Forecasting Water Quality of Collected Runoff from Windrow Composting Pad: Probabilistic Approach, Natalia V. Shim1 and Ernest W. Tollner2; 1PhD Student, College of Engineering, The University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602; 2Professor, College of Engineering, The University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602
  29. Annual Variation in Spatial Coverage of an Invasive Macrophyte within a Shallow, Subtropical Reservoir, Stephen Shivers; Graduate student, University of Georgia, JW Jones Ecological Research Center, Athens GA 30602
  30. Using Passive Interpretive Design Strategies to Remediate Brownfields in the Southeastern Piedmont, David W. Sizemore; Student, University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602
  31. Hydro-Climate Projections in the Cordex Mena Domain Using the Weather Research Forecast Model with Focus on the Eastern Nile Basin, Mahmoud A. Soliman; MS Student, Teaching and Research assistant at Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University
  32. Tracking the Influence of Septic Systems on Microbial Water Quality in Suburban Watersheds of Georgia, Robert Sowah; Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602
  33. Sustainable Water Management at the Hartsfield-Jacksoneld Atlanta International Airport, Tai Yi Su1 and Charles F. Marshall2; 1Senior Project Manager, AECOM; 2CEM, CEA, CBCP, CLEP Utilities Manager, Asset Management and Sustainability Division
  34. Response of Stream Biofilms Across an Urbanization Gradient, R Usher, J Wood, A Rosemond, and S Wenger; Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602
  35. The Spatio-Temporal Evolution of Irrigated Areas in the Georgia Coastal Plain, M. Williams
    Dept. of Geography, University of Georgia, Athens 30602
  36. Physical Attributes and Clutch Size of the Daggerblade Grass Shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, in Three Coastal Waterways of Savannah, Georgia, Coral A. Thompson1 and Sue C. Ebanks2; 1M.S. Candidate, Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Savannah State University; 2Assistant Professor, Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Savannah State University